WNYC

SIX-LEGGED FREAKS

After a Dengue Fever scare several years ago, the Florida Keys Mosquito Control Board has been trying to add a new tool to its already well-equipped arsenal for combating the Zika-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquito: Genetically modified mosquitoes from a British company called Oxitec. But families there aren't up for the experiment.
NOW, NOW MILDRED PLAY NICE!

Assaults on elderly nursing home residents by abusive caregivers can make big headlines. A new report suggests that as egregious as those assaults are, and as necessary as it is to prevent and detect them, nursing homes should be focusing attention on a lesser, but more common form of abuse: mistreatment of residents at the hands of fellow residents.
NO REST FOR THE WEARY

Since cholera first broke out in Haiti five years ago, Doctors Without Borders estimates that it has killed as many as 30,000 people, and another 2 million have survived the disease — which has been traced back to a UN compound that was housing peacekeepers from Nepal.
NOT JUST FUN AND WAR GAMES

"War Games," the 1983 movie starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy, was not only a great film. President Reagan saw it as a wake-up call that cyber war would become a reality. Fred Kaplan, Slate's War Stories columnist and the author of "Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War," reports on how the US has conducted "information warfare" since before the first Gulf War.
BLUE LIE SPECIAL

With the ongoing national and local discussion about criminal justice reform, WNYC spent five months looking at the issue of police officer credibility to see how often the NYPD’s 35,000 officers are found to distort the truth and what happens to them after.
TWO VERY SMALL TEST SUBJECTS

The physicians at St. Jude were trying something new: a chemotherapy drug cocktail paired with radiation. They called it “Total Therapy.” It’s an early variation of what most acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients still get today. But patients like James Eversull were among the first ones to try it, acting as experimental guinea pigs.
CAUGHT IN TWEEN

It's no secret that being 12 years old can be tough. At 12, kids shed layers, test new roles and transform before our eyes as they explore what kind of adult they want to be. Their brains and bodies change at alarming rates. At the same time, school gets harder. In New York City, academic performance in seventh grade largely sets a student's path in high school.
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